Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Why Apitong?? Selecting the Right Species for your Trailer Deck



Trailer manufacturers have used a wide range of species over the years to deck flatbeds, lowboys and other platform trailers. Before making a choice on which species to use for a wood floor, the consumer needs to understand that wood varies significantly by species – the mechanical and physical properties of a particular specie will impact the performance. 


During the 1960s, North American hardwood lumber — primarily oak, ash, beech, hickory and hard maple — were utilized extensively throughout the trailer industry. However the concern arose that domestic lumber from temperate forests was not strong enough to withstand the rigors of a platform trailer due to the weakness associated with knots and other defects. To obtain adequate trailer-grade flooring planks from domestic lumber, thorough selection was required to eliminate the defects — usually trimming boards and/or ripping them into narrow planks — which usually resulted in narrow, short-length pieces of 5' to 9'. Domestic hardwoods also have limited durability in exterior applications, and chemical treatment is necessary.


Some of these shortcomings in North American hardwood lumber were addressed when trailer manufacturers began using tropical hardwoods such as Apitong starting in the early 1970s. Because tropical climates have relatively consistent temperatures, the seasonal nature with which trees grow is mitigated and thus allows tropical species to grow at a steadier rate than those in temperate climates. Growth rings for tropical species are usually far more subtle, and grain tends to be consistently tight throughout the tree. The result is that Tropical species offer a strong lumber with reduced frequency of defects. Lumber cut from these trees can average lengths of 12' to 14', which eliminates multiple short component pieces when assembling a trailer deck.



Stength and Durability Characteristics of Typical Trailer Flooring Woods

Below is a table comparing the various types of wood that may be used in the trailer flooring industry:

SPECIES Approximate Weight per MBF at 10% MC Modulus of Rupture (psi) Modulus of Elasticity (1000 psi) Maximum Crushing Strength (psi) Side Hardness (lbs) Compression Perpendicular (psi) Shear (psi)
Purpleheart 4,800 21,300 2,420 11,380 2,060 1,910 1,830








Apitong 4,600 19,900 2,070 10,500 1,270 NA 2,070
Angelim Pedra 4,400 17,600 2,050 8,990 1,720 A 2,010
White Oak 4,200 15,200 1,780 7,440 1,360 1,070 1,360
Red Oak 3,900 14,300 1,820 6,760 1,070 1,010 1,780
Southern Yellow Pine 3,100 14,200 1,880 7,750 750 890 1,490
Douglas Fir 2,700 12,400 1,950 7,230 710 800 1,130
US Dept. of Agriculture Handbook No. 207
US Dept. of Agriculture Handbook No. 72, pp 4-24




Besides having the best strength-to-weight ratio of any species commercially used for trailer decks, Apitong (also known as Keruing) contains both a natural oleo-resin and has a silica content which is generally about 0.5%, thereby helping the wood endure outdoor elements. Other species which are also utilized due to their superior durability include Angelim Perdra / Parangelim and Purpleheart. 


With over 100 years of combined industry experience, TrailerDecking.com can help you make the right decision when it comes to selecting a specie for your trailer. We work closely with original equipment manufacturers, aftermarket repair shops, hardwood lumber distributors, fleet owners and independent owner-operators. All segments of the transportation industry rely on our knowledgeable staff for assistance in fulfilling their requirements for both original equipment and replacement parts.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

US Department of Commerce Sets Duty at 63% for Chinese Plywood

The US Department of Commerce has made a preliminary determination in its anti-dumping investigation of plywood manufactured in China and imported into the United States. Just over 100 Chinese manufacturers responded to inquiries from the US Department of Commerce and received a "cooperative" rate of 22% duty; whereas, Chinese companies that did not respond to the inquiry received a penalty rate of 63%. No doubt that this announcement will add further uncertainty to the imported plywood market.

Here's an article from the IWPA with more details.
International Wood Products Association: PressRelease_ITC-IWPA


Monday, January 14, 2013

Tropical Forest Management - South East Asian Environmental Practices / TrailerDecking.com

Welcome back to trailerdecking.blogspot.com, the most in-depth trailer decking series on the web. Today's blog is about South East Asian environmental forestry practices.

On the supply side, in both Malaysia and Indonesia, buyers have found a suitable measure of reliability and responsibility in the areas of tropical forest management and resource-based economic development. Tropical forests in both countries are essentially public lands, managed and protected by their respective Federal and State Governments.


Southeast Asian Tropical Forest


Forest Certification programs have emerged in both Malaysia (through the FSC and the MTCC programs) and Indonesia (through the FSC, SVLK and LEI programs). Certification is very much market driven and is serving as a tool towards promoting legal, reliable and sustainable forest management. Certification is seen as a step toward ensuring the production of a continuous flow of desired forest products and services from the forest reserves. Further, certification is being actively pursued to ensure continued market access of Malaysian and Indonesian timber products, particularly in an increasingly environmentally sensitive market.

Logging in Rain Forest

The Malaysian and Indonesian government and policy makers decision to promote a more stable currency policy is great news. Additionally, with the impetus of emerging Forest Certification Schemes offering a legal, reliable and sustainable supply situation, we feel confident that a reliable supply of Apitong in the trailer market is ensured.

Rain Forest Logging

We at Nova USA Wood Products and TrailerDecking.com offer a wide variety of Apitong products for the trailer and truck body industry. We purchase only the best materials from reputable mills that place an emphasis on quality and delivery. We are also one of the few suppliers who have overseas inspectors in place to ensure that material is thoroughly checked before it departs the mill. This final inspection ensures that you get exactly what you ordered each and every time. We certify all of our trailer decking products and warranty them against defects in workmanship. Contact us for a quote today.

Friday, January 11, 2013

Tropical Forest Management - Southeast Asian Environmental Practices / TrailerDecking.com

Welcome back to trailerdecking.blogspot.com, the most in-depth trailer decking series on the web. Today's blog is about Southeast Asian environmental forestry practices.

On the supply side, in both Malaysia and Indonesia, buyers have found a suitable measure of reliability and responsibility in the areas of tropical forest management and resource-based economic development. Tropical forests in both countries are essentially public lands, managed and protected by their respective Federal and State Governments.


Southeast Asian Tropical Forest


Forest Certification programs have emerged in both Malaysia (through the FSC and the MTCC programs) and Indonesia (through the FSC, SVLK and LEI programs). Certification is very much market driven and is serving as a tool towards promoting legal, reliable and sustainable forest management. Certification is seen as a step toward ensuring the production of a continuous flow of desired forest products and services from the forest reserves. Further, certification is being actively pursued to ensure continued market access of Malaysian and Indonesian timber products, particularly in an increasingly environmentally sensitive market.


The Malaysian and Indonesian government and policy makers decision to promote a more stable currency policy is great news. Additionally, with the impetus of emerging Forest Certification Schemes offering a legal, reliable and sustainable supply situation, we feel confident that a reliable supply of Apitong in the trailer market is ensured.


We at Nova USA Wood Products and TrailerDecking.com offer a wide variety of Apitong products for the trailer and truck body industry. We purchase only the best materials from reputable mills that place an emphasis on quality and delivery. We are also one of the few suppliers who have overseas inspectors in place to ensure that material is thoroughly checked before it departs the mill. This final inspection ensures that you get exactly what you ordered each and every time. We certify all of our trailer decking products and warranty them against defects in workmanship. Contact us for a quote today.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Is Exotic Hardwood Trailer Flooring Better Than Domestic?

Trailer flooring takes a lot more abuse than regular hardwood flooring or decking. Even if you aren't a huge shipping company and only use your trailer bed for hauling every now and then, the flooring needs to be stronger, more durable, and more resistant to the elements than anything you might install in your home. At TrailerDecking.com, we sell Apitong, the tough-as-nails exotic trailer flooring material trusted by industry professionals for years. But does trailer flooring need to be exotic? Can domestic hardwood work just as well as trailer flooring? The answer, in our opinion, is no. Here's why:

Hardness
Janka hardness rating is probably the most important factor when considering trailer flooring material. A wood's hardness plays a big part in determining how much weight it can carry and how resistent it is to dents, scratches, and other common wear. The hardness rating of Aptiong trailer floorig is 1,270 pounds. Most common domestic hardwoods, such as Cherry, Pine, Fir, and Cedar, have hardness ratings upwards of 1,000 pounds and as low as 350 pounds. In short, exotic hardwoods almost always have a higher hardness rating than domestics, making them much more suitable for trailer flooring.

Durability
There are many factors that contribute to a hardwood species' durability; namely, strength, stiffness, and density.
Strength refers to how much weight the wood can carry before it will break. Stiffness refers to the bending strength of the wood; in other words, how much pressure the material can take before being deformed or warped. Combined, these two metrics can tell you a great deal about how much weight your trailer flooring will be able to hold. Apitong has strength and stiffness ratings of 19,900 PSI and 2,070 1000 PSI, respectively. Domestic hardwoods tend to have strength and stiffness ratings that are much lower; anywhere from 7,500 PSI - 12,600 PSI for strength and 800 1000 PSI - 1,700 1000 PSI for stiffness.
Density is another important factor when determining a wood's durability. The more dense the wood, the less susceptible it will be to changes in temperature and humidity. A high density also means the wood is less susceptible to wood-boring insects. Apitong has a density of 790 KG/m3, while domestic hardwoods usually fall into the range of 670 KG/m3 - 260 KG/m3. Clearly, exotic hardwood trailer flooring is more durable than its domestic counterpart.

Cost
While domestic hardwoods tend to have a smaller up-front cost, because they are less durable than exotics they tend to need replacing more often. Apitong, for example, can last in normal above-ground working conditions for up to 15 years. You'd be lucky to get a good 5 years out of some domestic hardwoods. The larger up-front cost of exotic trailer flooring may seem intimidating, but you'll save yourself a whole lot of time and money in the long run.

As you can see, exotic hardwood makes for a much stronger and more reliable trailer flooring material. Want to learn more? Contact TrailerDecking today to talk with one of our knowledgeable sales reps. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Angelim Pedra VS Apitong: Which Flooring Material Is Right For You? [INFOGRAPHIC]

For years, Asian Apitong has been the standard hardwood choice for trailer flooring and truck bed applications. More recently, another hardwood species has made an impact on the trailer flooring world: Angelim Pedra. Both are great options for industrial uses such as trailer flooring, but which is the right choice for you?

The following infographic compares the two species by four important metrics; hardness, strength, stiffness, and density. We hope this helps shed some light on the issue and gives you the information you need to decide which is best for you. Enjoy!

apitong vs angelim pedra trailer flooring

As you can see, both varieties have their pros and cons. Angelim Pedra beats Apitong in both hardness and density, while Apitong is the clear choice in terms of strength and stiffness. Both are superior trailer flooring products, so the choice is often a matter of personal preference. Which do you prefer? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Top 3 Lumber Choices for Trailer Flooring

Not every hardwood species or variety of species is appropriate for trailer flooring applications. Some species are too soft. Others are too susceptible to inclement weather. Here at TrailerDecking, we get a lot of questions about what are the best lumber choices for trailer decks and beds, so we decided to compile a list of our favorite species and varieties. These choices represent the strongest and longest-lasting trailer flooring options on the market. Enjoy!

apitong trailer flooring

Apitong Truck Flooring
Apitong is our most popular truck flooring product, and for good reason. It is incredibly strong (10,500 psi) and has a hardness rating of 1,270 lbs. While it is not naturally very resistant to wood boring insects or inclement weather, it works great with an application of high-quality sealant. It is also a great trailer flooring choice for dry climates or covered beds.

Angelim Pedra Truck Flooring
Considered one of the most durable truck flooring options, Angelim Pedra has a hardness rating of 1,720 lbs and a strength of 8,990 psi. What it lacks in superior strength it more than makes up for in stability and durability. Angelim Pedra truck flooring is one of the most stable hardwood options you can pick, second only to Purpleheart, meaning it is much less likely to warp and buckle over time. It is also rated very resistant to both white-rot and brown-rot fungus, making it a great choice for more humid climates.

Laminated Truck Flooring
Laminated truck flooring isn't exactly a specific species, obviously, but it is still one of the most popular options on the market today. Laminated truck flooring, or LTF, is used strictly in dry van trailers as it can't withstand exterior exposure. This frees up manufacturers to use softer woods that wouldn't otherwise be appropriate for trailer flooring applications, such as Red Oak and mixed light hardwoods from Southeast Asia.

Have questions about which trailer flooring choice is right for you? Contact TrailerDecking.com today to speak with one of our knowledgeable representatives. We'd be happy to help!